All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry

How Stress Affects Oral Health

December 4th, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let's face it parents, the month of December is usually packed with travel, family, and vacations! This can be a stressful time of the year. So this month we are going to focus on how to deal with stress.

Most of people know a thing or two about stress. Whether you’re dealing with chronic stress, or a brief stressful life circumstance, we all encounter it from time to
time. Most people associate stress with major health issues, such as heart attacks or ulcers, but do you know how stress can affect your oral health?

Stress may negatively affect your oral health in indirect ways.

For starters, stress can cause folks to reach for coping strategies that aren’t so good for
your teeth (or the rest of your body).

Junk food, sweets, sugary drinks, sodas, and chewing gum are just a few examples. When these substances interact with your teeth, they can do a lot of damage in the way of gum disease and tooth decay.

Secondly, when we are stressed, we tend to stop making positive health behaviors a
priority. Let’s say you’re traveling to a far off destination; your brushing and
flossing routine will not be forefront on your mind.

Even a minor bout of stress from a tough day can have us reaching for our cozy bed
and some relieve instead of taking the time to brush first.

And of course, keeping up with routine dental visits may fall completely off our
priority list while under stress. This can prevent us from finding the early signs of
decay and can cause more pain and stress later on.

How does stress affect our mouths directly?

Well, lots of people grind their teeth as a physical way to deal with stress, this is evident in children's teeth, too. You may be doing it without even realizing it! Ask a partner or someone who knows you well to tell you if you have this habit.

What does tooth grinding sound like?

It has been said that it sounds like nails on a chalkboard or someone chewing on rocks! Either one sounds extremely bad.

What can help relieve tooth grinding?

A nightguard MAY be a good option to relieve tooth grinding and thereby decrease some stress. Nightguards are custom made so that they do not flop in your mouth, while sleeping. They are made to cover either the upper arch or the lower arch of teeth. In either case, talk to your pediatric dentist, if your child or teenager has excessive tooth grinding.

Also, when we are stressed we have higher levels of stress hormones, such as cortisol
and adrenaline, that put our body in a “flight or fight” state. This causes our blood
pressure and blood sugar to increase, and our digestive and immune function to
decrease. When our immune system isn’t functioning as it should, this can make
periodontal disease more likely. It can also slow down the healing of other oral issues
or injuries we may have.

What can you do about it?

The best thing you can do to prevent the stress of oral health issues is to maintain
good dental hygiene and visit us regularly for routine visits. We want what’s best for
you — and that includes a healthy mouth for a lifetime!

All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit. Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention. For more information about improving your child's oral health check out our preventive dentistry page. Still want more information? Check out our monthly blog posts! Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Get acquainted with us by watching our practice video and find out what we do.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy! Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online. Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send. On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time. For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

Should I Brush Before Flossing?

November 7th, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is an age-old question. Should you floss before you brush or after? If you asked any one of our team members, you just might get a different answer on this one!

Before you report them for not knowing their stuff, each response can be right! As long as you’re doing a thorough job when you floss! Let me explain.

The Case for Flossing Before Brushing

Theoretically, flossing first dislodges the gunk between your teeth, letting the fluoride in your toothpaste reach those crevices better.

Also, behavioral scientists say since most people don’t like to floss, it’s better to get the least-pleasant half of your dental routine out of the way first – you’ll be less likely to skip it.

Once you have a minty, fresh mouth from brushing, you might be less inclined to feel the need to floss afterward.

The Case for Flossing After Brushing

Some say flossing last is better because it clears your mouth from extra food and debris that could otherwise be carried by the floss into the very spaces you’re trying to clean out.

Plus, it might be more pleasant to put those flossing hands into a clean mouth versus an unbrushed one.

Bottom Line

Floss when it works for you. But make it a habit! Choose the same time every day, floss once a day, and floss thoroughly.

And don’t forget to use the right flossing method: for each new set of teeth, use a new section of floss, and hug each side of the tooth by dragging the floss upward in the shape of a “C.”  Need a refresher? Check out our flossing illustration to help you keep those pearly white teeth clean.

Want us to show you how? Just ask!

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry also has a handy infographic to maintaining healthy teeth for your children.

Last Note

Just remember, if you want your children to have healthy oral habits, such as flossing, you will have to start doing it yourself. Daily.  Research has shown that children mirror their parents.  Why not get them to start a habit that will be beneficial and one that they can use to save their teeth for the rest of their life!

All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit. Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention. For more information about brushing and flossing check out our preventive care page. Still want more information? Check out our blog posts on prevention! Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Get acquainted with us by watching our practice video and find out what we do.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy! Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online. Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send. On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time. For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

 

 

Electrical or Manual Toothbrush: Which is Better?

September 13th, 2018

This is one of our most frequently asked questions!

Our answer? It’s not the brush that matters, it’s who’s doing the brushing.

Let’s break that down. The goal of tooth brushing is to remove plaque from your teeth on a consistent (daily!) basis, so that we prevent the buildup of tartar which leads to tooth decay.

Manual Toothbrush

A manual toothbrush is a great and inexpensive tool that helps us do just that. Make sure to brush at least for two minutes per day, twice a day. Gently brush ALL surfaces and make sure to reach those back molars.

If you need some help with visualizing the proper techniques, here are some helpful recommendations.

Electric Toothbrush

For some people, it can be difficult to brush properly with a manual toothbrush. Those with some form of motor disability or arthritis may benefit from using an electric toothbrush. An electric brush can also be helpful for kids or anyone with braces.

The same tooth brushing rules apply – two times per day, two minutes at a time. One advantage of an electric toothbrush is that some have a built-in timer. If you’re one of those quick brushers who has a hard time making it to two minutes, consider using a timed electric brush.

Round vs Rectangular

When picking an electric toothbrush, pick one that has a round brush head instead of a rectangular head.  A rounded brush head can more easily maneuver around teeth, especially those hard to get molars.

What about Battery operated toothbrushes?

You've all seen those cute battery operated electric toothbrushes with that are decked out in action figure brands or stylish colors.  Note, only some allow for battery replacement when they start to run low.  Moreover, very few allow the brush head to be changed.

An electric toothbrush would be recommended for long term use.  Just replace the brush head every 6 months.

Cost of Electric Toothbrushes

Some are deterred by the cost of electric toothbrushes.  They can range from $30 to over $130.  A solid $30 electric toothbrush can last over a decade with proper care use.

Take home message: When choosing an electric toothbrush, choose function over all the bells and whistles.

At your next dental visit, ask us whether we think you would do better with a manual or electric brush! And, as always, don’t forget to floss!

Bonus: How do astronauts brush their teeth?

Here's a bonus video from astronaut Chad Hadfield, who is commander of the International Space Station.  He explains who he brushes his teeth while in space! Find out what type of toothbrush he uses in outer space!

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit. Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention. For more information about brushing and flossing check out our preventive care page. Still want more information? Check out our blog posts on prevention! Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy! Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online. Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send. On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time. For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

 

Obey Your Thirst: Effects of Soda on Your Teeth and Your Body

August 2nd, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have you ever seen those videos where someone puts a baby tooth in a glass of soda and watches it decay? Well, the effect of soda in an actual mouth is a bit different. You have your saliva to help wash away the sugar, you eat other things throughout the day, and brush at least twice a day to remove debris or plaque. Nevertheless, soda is not something we recommend you consume more often than a once-in-awhile treat. Here’s why:

Sugar

Soda has an extremely high sugar content. The bacteria that cause tooth decay feed off of sugar and excrete acid, which is what causes tooth decay. The more sugar our teeth have to interact with, the more prone to decay they will be.  The beverage industry refutes the science, however if you search online for "Mountain Dew Mouth," you will see the ill effects of soda drinking that is ravishing Appalachia. In this community, the scale of economics has led to a catastrophic public health crisis of oral health.  Since the cost of soda is less than the cost of milk, many families give their children and infants soda to drink.

Acid

Think diet soda is a better alternative? Even though it contains zero sugar, it can still contain acids such as phosphoric acid or citric acid. Acid eats away at a tooth’s enamel and leaves it prone to decay.  Soda may also rob you of your calcium deposits on your teeth and body (see below Bone Density Disease).

Colors

Caramel color, Yellow 5, etc. Any type of artificial coloring can cause tooth-staining.
If you prefer your teeth sparkling white, it’s best to stay away from soda.

Effects of Soda on Your Body

Drinking carbonated drinks, like sodas, can adversely affect your health.  Sodas add additional "empty" calories that have no nutritional benefit to you while simply adding to your total caloric intake.  What does this mean? Soda drinking can lead to weight gain.

Childhood Obesity

Childhood obesity has tripled since the 1970s, according to the Centers for Disease Control.¹ This means 1 in 5 school age children or young adult are considered obese.

Dehydration

There is nothing quite like a soda on a hot summer day, right? Well, that's what the cola companies try to portray on their television ads. However, consuming high quantities of sodas can actually make you feel worse on a hot day.  Sodas often contain caffeine.  Caffeine is a natural diuretic, which removes water from your system.  The more you drink sodas or caffeinated drinks, the more water leaves your system.

Diabetes

Since sodas are packed with sugars, your body gets a sugar rush.  Initially, your body will self regulate to take care of the excess sugars.  However, over time, the body loses its innate ability to regulate the flood of sugars and may lead to diabetes.² This most often leads to Type 2 Diabetes, where the body does not use insulin well to control the blood sugar levels.

Bone Density Disease

Drinking sodas may lead to decreasing your body's calcium levels.³ A Cleveland Clinic report stated that osteoporosis, especially in women, maybe due in part to drinking sodas.

Recommendations

Instead of soda, we recommend spicing up your daily beverages with other alternatives. How about plain water infused with fresh fruit? If you MUST (on a rare occasions) drink soda, make sure to use a straw and always rinse with water after 3o minutes. And, as always, keep up with regular brushing and flossing to protect those precious teeth!

For more information about Nutrition and Oral Health, here are some helpful recommendations.

References

1. https://www.cdc.gov/healthyschools/obesity/facts.htm

2. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/basics/diabetes.html

3. https://health.clevelandclinic.org/sodas-tea-coffee-can-make-bones-brittle/

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit. Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention. For more information about brushing and flossing check out our preventive care page. Still want more information? Check out our blog posts on prevention! Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy! Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online. Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send. On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time. For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

So as as one cola company ad slogan puts it, "Obey your thirst!"  Reach for the water, instead of the soda!

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

Baby Steps Series: Choosing the Right Toothpaste

June 13th, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

Question: Doctor, what toothpaste do you recommend for my children?

Answer: Any fluoride toothpaste that will help you maintain a good oral health routine!

Question: What's the big deal about fluoride? What does it do?

Answer: Fluoride helps by reducing the risk of dental decay (or dental cavities) in several ways.

First, it helps to remineralizes (or harden) the enamel.  Every time you eat your teeth get bathed in an acidic environment.  This acid is important to breakdown food, but it can also breakdown the enamel on your teeth.  This is the reason why you should not constantly snack throughout the day...the acid will eventually breakdown the enamel.  If the enamel has a break, it causes a pit to form, which is now considered a cavity.  Using a fluoride toothpaste after meals and snacks will reduce the acid attack but remineralizing the enamel.

Second, fluoride can strengthen weakened enamel in surface cavities.  Proper use can prevent a surface cavity from growing, therefore possibly eliminating the need for a dental filling.

Finally, fluoride has antibacterial properties. It helps to prevent acid production from plaque producing bacteria.

Question: I have a toddler, is a fluoride toothpaste safe for him? If it is, when should I start using it to brush his teeth?

Answer: The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends using a fluoride toothpaste as soon as first teeth erupt. This means starting to brush with a fluoride toothpaste from an early age. Normally teeth start to erupt around 6 months of age.

Question: How much toothpaste should I use for my toddler? I'm afraid he will swallow it and get a tummy ache.

Answer: Great question. For children who are not able to spit out on their own, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends using a "dry rice grain" amount of flouridated toothpaste.  This amount will give your child the proper benefits of flouride without causing them to have a tummy ache, if they swallow any of the paste.

Question: How do I pick the right fluoride toothpaste for my child?

Answer: We know you have a million and one choices facing you in the toothpaste aisle, and it can be hard to figure out what’s best for you. Most people, however, can use any toothpaste that has the ADA (American Dental Association) seal of approval. This seal means that the toothpaste contains fluoride, has the right amount of abrasiveness (not too little and not too much), and has been shown to be both safe and effective for intended use. If you have any sensitivity to dyes, preservatives, or certain ingredients, opt for a toothpaste that is free of those, such as Tom's of Maine. Just make sure it has fluoride.

Question: What is the proper way to brush my child's teeth?

Answer: Here is a quick graphic that will illustrate the basic technique of toothbrushing. Note, most children cannot master toothbrushing on their own so continue to supervise their toothbrushing and then go in for a quick spot check after they are done. For more information, visit our preventive care page.

We can’t say it enough: fluoride is your best form of cavity prevention!

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit. Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention. For more information about brushing and flossing check out our preventive care page. Still want more information? Check out our blog posts on prevention! Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy! Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online. Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send. On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time. For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

*This blog is part of the Baby Steps Series. Look for future blogs in this series.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

 

What to Do When You Crack a Tooth

May 15th, 2018

Ouch!
Chomp on something your tooth didn’t like? Or get hit in the mouth with a hockey puck?

If you think you may have a cracked tooth, or if you’re holding a piece of your tooth in your hand, follow these steps!

Steps to Follow:

1. Contact us a call to schedule an appointment. Let us know about your emergency and we will make our best effort to see you right away.

2. If there are tooth fragments that have fallen out, preserve them in a clean container with a moist solution (cold mik, water, saliva), and bring them in to your appointment.

3. Apply a cold pack to your jaw to lessen any pain and swelling.

4. If your mouth is bleeding, bite down on a gauze pad until the bleeding stops.

Cracked tooth?

It is possible to have a cracked tooth and not know it.

If you have any pain when biting down, or when eating something hot or cold, it’s best to get it checked out.

In order to prevent further damage to the tooth or an infection, it’s very important to correct a cracked tooth immediately.

Be sure to check out our website, for more information on taking care of dental emergencies.

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit. Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention. For more information about brushing and flossing check out our preventive care page. Still want more information? Check out our blog posts on prevention! Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy! Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online. Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send. On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time. For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

 

Foods That Cause Tooth Decay

April 19th, 2018

 

 

Acid Attack!

When it comes to tooth decay, it’s important to know the main culprit – acid!

Acid is what eats a way at our enamel and causes cavities. Acid can enter our mouths in one of two ways: either directly through what we eat (citrus fruits, for example), or as a byproduct when oral bacteria consume the sugars that we eat.

The Litmus Test

Ultimately, a simple way to identify foods that cause tooth decay is to ask whether it’s acidic or sweet/starchy.

Acids vs. Carbs

Acidic foods include things like citrus fruits, tomatoes, vinegar, kombucha and sour candy.

Sweet/starchy foods include things like candy, soda or sugar-sweetened beverages, fruit, bread, cereal, pasta and crackers.

Note, sweets and starchy foods are lumped into one category since they both are composed of simple sugars in their most basic building blocks.  So if you think eating potato chips are healthier than eating M&Ms, they are not. You are eating sugar in both cases.

Does it matter how many times a day I snack on these foods or drinks?

The longer these things interact with your teeth, the greater the chance for tooth decay to
occur.  Also, the frequency is just as important to note.  If you frequently snack on acidic foods or drinks and/or sweet or starchy foods and drinks, then you are MORE at risk to develop dental caries (cavities)!

For example, sipping on soda throughout the day, or chewing a gooey caramel treat, increases the amount of sugar that coat your teeth. Bacteria love to feast on this sugar, creating an acidic environment and putting your teeth at risk for decay.

Six ways to protect your teeth against tooth decay:

1.  Reduce your consumption of sweets and refined starches.

This isn't difficult, however you have to make a choice requiring will power.

2. Enjoy acidic foods in moderation or as part of a meal.

Decrease snacking.  If must snack between meals, try carrot sticks or celery sticks.

 3. Decrease or eliminate your consumption of soda or sugar-sweetened beverages.

Make a mental note, drinking sodas or sweetened drinks are just empty calories that do not provide any nutritional value.

4. Swish with water after meals and snacks.

Trying doing it for 30 seconds each time.

5. Maintain good oral hygiene to brush away plaque buildup.

Floss at least once a day and brush twice a day.

6. And, as always, make sure to visit us regularly so we can remove tartar buildup and assess for early signs of decay.

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit. Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention. For more information about brushing and flossing check out our preventive care page. Still want more information? Check out our blog posts on prevention! Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy! Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online. Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send. On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time. For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

 

Five Reasons for Healthy Teeth

February 16th, 2018

5 Reasons for Healthy Teeth

1.  Love.

Love your teeth? Get into the routine of making them a priority, so they will last a lifetime.  Honor your body. By taking care of your body using preventive measures, you will not only enjoy good health, but feel great. You deserve it!

2. Your Priority Reflects On Your Own Inner Values.

At a minimum, brush your teeth two times a day and floss once a day. That's just 6 minutes out of your day! Want to find about more techniques? Check out our website's preventive care page.

3. Your Heart Will Thank You.

Oral health is linked to heart health. How? Plaque and bacteria from your gumline can find its way into your bloodstream and heart. Gum disease can lead to bone loss causing teeth to feel loose.  Learn more about how to keep your gums healthy by reading gum disease on our website.

4. Be Motivated.

Did you know only 12% of the general population floss their teeth on a daily basis? You can do it! Then you too can be part of this healthy group.

5. Pass Along the Information.

Become an oral health ambassador.  If you have children or other loved ones in your household, then share with them the painless way to healthy teeth.

There are more ways to have healthy teeth.  Continue to checkout our blog posts for more information.  Our website also great info on oral hygiene and diet recommendations.

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit. Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention. For more information about brushing and flossing check out our preventive care page. Still want more information? Check out our blog posts on prevention! Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy! Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online. Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send. On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time. For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

 

How Often Should You See the Dentist

January 2nd, 2018

We love our patients, so we’d be more than happy to see you every day! Alas, we realize that’s not really possible, so here are some more realistic guidelines for making appointments.

In general, it all depends on your oral health status and your health history.

For most patients, the optimal frequency to visit the dentist is twice a year. In six months, enough tartar and plaque can build up to require a dental check-up and cleaning, especially if your dental hygiene isn’t as rigorous as it should be.

For others with gum disease, a genetic predisposition for plaque build-up or cavities, in braces, or have a weakened immune system, you’ll need to visit more frequently for optimal care.

Depending on where you fall in those categories, we will prescribe the necessary frequency to keep your optimal health.

It’s important to keep your routine visits with us so that:

  • We can check for problems that you might not see or feel. Want more information? Check out our Teeth for Life section on our website.
  • We can find early signs of decay (decay doesn’t become visible or cause pain until it reaches more advanced stages).  An ounce of prevention goes a long way.  See our previous blog, Understanding the 5 Stages of Tooth Decay.
  • We can treat most oral health problems found affecting children (generally, the earlier a problem is found, the more manageable it is).  If your child requires treatment outside the scope of Dr. Job's expertise, we will refer your child to another outstanding specialist.
  • Routine visits become routine when your child feels comfortable in the dental setting.  Having a dental home for your child is important for them to feel safe and comfortable. Read about why so many patients continue to come to our practice at All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry.  Check out our section on, What Sets Us Apart. 

There you have it! Those are the brass tacks for how often you should schedule an appointment.

But don’t let this keep you from stopping in and saying hi whenever you’re in the neighborhood!

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy.

Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online.  Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send.  On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time.  For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

Dr. Allen Job and his team would love seeing your smile!

 

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

 

Baby Steps Series: Tongue Tie and Lip Tie Laser Treatment

November 1st, 2017

What is a tongue tie?

A tongue tie or ankyloglossia occurs when there is an abnormal band of thick tissue, also known as the frenum, which is located below the tongue.

How does a tongue tie affect feeding of newborn babies?

A tongue tie prevents the tongue from having the full range of motion.  This is considered a developmental problem since it arises before a baby is born.  Tongue tie restricts how a newborn nurses, often causing improper latch with the mother’s nipple.

What other problems can arise from having a tongue tie?

Having a tongue tie can create speech difficulties, malocclusion, and gum recession.1

Is having a tongue tie pretty common?

Tongue tie occurs between 4% - 10.7% of the population.2

Are there different types of tongue tie?

Anterior Tongue Tie

Yes, there are two primary forms of tongue ties complete and partial.3  When the frenum has limited tongue movement it is considered a partial ankyloglossia.  This is known as an anterior tongue tie. Often, one can see an anterior tongue tie since it appears as a thin band of tissue under the tongue.

Posterior Tongue Tie

However, if  the tongue appears to be fused to the floor of the mouth it is then considered to be a total ankyloglossia.  This is known as a posterior tongue tie. Posterior tongue ties are much harder to visualize.  The tongue has to be elevated from the floor of the mouth in order to diagnose a posterior tongue tie.

What is a lip tie?

An upper lip tie is present when the upper lip is lifted and the band of connective tissue (frenum) is tight, causing the gums to blanch (turn white).  There are four classifications for lip tie, ranging from mild (Class 1) to severe (Class 4).

What are the 4 classifications of Lip Tie?

Class I: Mucosal

Class 2: Gingival

Class 3: Papillary

Class 4:  Papilla Penetrating

Upper Lip, Lower Lip, and Tongue Ties. Can someone have more than 1 lip tie?

A lip tie can occur on either, the upper lip, the lower lip, or both.  Often a lip tie accompanies a tongue tie.

How does a lip tie affect a baby?

Lip ties can be associated with breastfeeding difficulties in infants.4   They can be associated with facial cervical caries (tooth decay at the gumline), due to interference with proper oral hygiene.5  Moreover, they can also be associated with the gum recession. 6

How are tongue and lip ties treated?

Physicians, such as an ENT (Ear Nose Throat Specialist), usually will treat tongue and lip ties with a scalpel or surgical scissors.  They may also require treatment to be completed with some form of sedation, ranging from local anesthetic to general anesthesia.  Sutures or stitches may also need to be placed.

Today, pediatric dentists and some physicians trained in treating tongue tie and lip ties can perform this procedure in an outpatient setting, using a laser.  With using a laser, there is less pain, less bleeding, and no need for sutures.  This translates to faster healing and in most cases quicker resolution to the problem.  This form of treatment usually requires using just a topical anesthetic and occasionally, a local anesthetic.

How long does the procedure take?

The procedure usually takes less than 10 minutes from start to finish.  Mothers are able to nurse right after procedure with their infant.

What happens after the procedure?

In order to get optimal results and to ensure proper healing, it is essential that parents complete the post treatment therapy exercises with their infant and also follow-up with a daily oral hygiene routine.  Moreover, a series of follow-up care appointments will be setup to monitor the healing process.

What about older children or adults?

Older children and adults can also benefit from lip tie and tongue tie correction.  The benefits include: improved oral hygiene, decreasing orthodontic severity especially from lip tie treatment, and improved speech.

 

If your child is showing signs of tongue tie or lip tie, contact Dr. Allen Job at All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, to for a comprehensive evaluation to see if your child will be a good candidate for laser treatment.

References

  1. Segal L, Stephenson R, Dawes M, Feldman P. Prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of ankyloglossia. Can Fam Physician 2007;53(6):1027-33
  2. Boutsi EZ, Tatakis DN. Maxillary labial frenum attachment in children. Int J Paediatr Dent 2011;21(4):284-8.
  3. McDonald RE, Avery DR, Weddell JA. Gingivitis and periodontal disease. In: Dean JA, Avery DR, McDonald RE, eds. McDonald and Avery’s Dentistry for the Child and Adolescent. 9th ed. Maryland Heights, Mo: Mosby Elsevier; 2011:389-91.
  4. Coryllos E, Genna CW, Salloum A. Congenital tongue-tie and its impact on breastfeeding. Breastfeeding: Best for baby and mother. Am Acad Pedia (newsletter) 2004; Summer:1-7.
  5. Kotlow L. The influence of the maxillary frenum on the development and pattern of dental caries on anterior teeth in breastfeeding infants: Prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. J Hum Lact 2010;26(3):304-8.
  6. Minsk L. The frenectomy as an adjunct to periodontal Compend Contin Educ Dent 2002;23(5): 424-6, 428.

*This blog is part of the Baby Steps Series. Look for future blogs in this series.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

Proper Brushing FAQs

October 9th, 2017

Mouth open or mouth closed?

Before breakfast or after breakfast?

Flat or at an angle?

Manual toothbrush or electric toothbrush?

We brush our teeth every day (hopefully!), but who knew it was this complicated. Just grab a brush a get to work, right?

Not so fast, my friend! There are actually some best practices to be mindful of when brushing those pearly whites. The trick is cutting through the fat and finding out exactly what works.

We live in a world of alternate facts, truthiness, and lists of “7 Ways to Keep Your Teeth Clean Without Picking Up a Toothbrush.” What’s even correct these days?!

Fear not, because we’ve got you covered with this handy FAQ (frequently asked questions)
guide. We’ll keep it simple with some easy dos and don’ts of brushing. Let’s get to it!

Proper Brushing Habits:

1. Don’t: Keep your brush flat.

  • Do: Use a 45-degree angle when brushing.

2. Don’t: Use looooooooong strokes. No need to cover your whole mouth in one stroke!

  • Do: Use short, circular strokes.

3. Don’t: Brush with the force of a giant. This isn’t a strongman contest!

  • Do: Gently cover all areas. A gentle touch helps prevent wear and tear on your enamel.

4. Don’t: Go one and done.

  • Do: Brush at least twice a day, especially after eating or drinking something acidic (like citrus fruits or soda). If you have something acidic to eat or drink, remember to wait 30 minutes before you brush your teeth.

5. Don’t: Be sentimental and use the same toothbrush for life.

  • Do: Change your toothbrush every 3-4 months. A trick to remember: switch out on the first day of each season.

6. Don’t: Be average – the average person brushes their teeth for 45 seconds.

  • Do: Brush for a full 2 minutes. A helpful trick: say the alphabet while brushing a certain section, move to the next section after you hit Z.

7. Don’t: Keep your toothbrush in a closed container.

  • Do: All your toothbrush to air dry.

8. Don’t: Store your toothbrush on the sink counter where bathroom particles can get on it.

  • Do: Store your toothbrush in the medicine cabinet.

9. Don’t: Wield a tough-bristled brush.

  • Do: Use a soft-bristled toothbrush, which is much better for your tooth enamel
    And there we have it! Some easy practices to keep that perfect smile.

10. Don't: Brush your teeth before meals or snacks.

  • Do: Brushing your teeth AFTER meals and snacks will remove more food debris and plaque off your teeth than brushing them before.

Remember: Brushing is only 4 minutes out of the day, so why not make it the best 4 minutes of the day!

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven brushing techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit.  Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention.  For more information about brushing and flossing check out our preventive care page.  Still want more information? Check out our blog posts on prevention!  Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy!  Start here. All of our forms are online.  Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send.  On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time.  For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

Caries Risk Assessment - What's the big deal?

May 4th, 2017

What is the Caries Risk Assessment Tool?

The Caries Risk Assessment Tool is a research-based tool used to identify the risk factors that cause dental decay. It is also used to provide recommendations to reduce the risk of future cavities.  It has been well documented that dental decay affects children throughout their childhood and into their early adulthood.  The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey showed that there has been a significant increase in dental decay in primary (baby) teeth.  This study further revealed that in U.S. children ages 2-5, one in four had dental decay.  Moreover, one half of children ages 12-15 had dental decay.

Why is this needed?

Instead of just filling cavities, this new method helps identify the cavity-forming risk factors and then provides guidelines to prevent future dental cavities.  The old method of just treating dental decay did not address the root factors that cause dental decay.  Several years ago, leading dental experts, ranging from educators, clinicians, and policy makers, converged to create the Caries Risk Assessment tool. Using the Caries Risk Assessment is a new paradigm shift that helps health care providers and educators provide specific recommendations to decrease the risk of getting dental caries.

What are the categories?

There are 3 risk categories:  High, Moderate, and Low

For each category there are recommendations based on the child’s age.

Some common recommendations include: nutrition changes, use of fluoride supplements, sealants, and more frequent cleaning and checkups.

Still need more information?

For additional information you may contact these organizations:

I've got it, what should I expect at my child's next dental visit?

At your child's next dental checkup visit, you will be asked a few questions that will help determine your child's risk for dental decay.  These responses will be used along with the information Dr. Allen Job gather's during your child's examination to determine your child's risk for dental decay.  Dr. Job and his team will be review that information with you at the end of the appointment.

How often will the Caries Risk Assessment be performed?

The Caries Risk Assessment will be performed each time at you're child's checkup appointment.  This is an ongoing process.   Our goal at All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry is to prevent dental decay from starting in your child.  This involves providing you with easy ways to prevent dental decay. Our secondary goal is to convert Moderate and High Risk patients into Low Risk patients.

Contact our office, All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry to schedule an appointment with Dr. Allen Job.  Dr. Job and his team will be able to provide you with more information for your child at his or her visit.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

April is National Facial Protection Month

April 24th, 2017

 

If your child is actively participating in sports in sunny San Diego, whether it is softball, basketball, football, then he or she is at greater risk for dental injuries.  A dental sports injury can occur in the form of a chipped or cracked tooth, broken jaw, cuts to the inside of the mouth, lips, and/or tongue.

Here are some dental facts:

  • Did you know that 3 out of 4 children will have experienced some type of injury to their teeth by the age of 15?
  • Girls are more likely to have a dental injury due to sports.
  • The cost of treating sports-related dental injuries can cost thousands of dollars! (Factor in the time and cost of treatment, numerous follow up visits, and time lost from work and school.)

Custom Mouthguard

A custom athletic mouthguard is an easy way to protect your child’s teeth during sports.  It will cushion the impact from a fall or an errand blow to the mouth.  Every year there are 200,000 dental injuries that are prevented by using a mouthguard.  Using a well fitting mouthguard can lessen the impact from concussions and jaw fractures.  Moreover, a well fitting mouthguard can reduce soft tissue injuries to the cheeks, tongue, and lips.

Dr. Allen Job says, “custom athletic mouthguards are made to fit your child’s mouth comfortably.”  They optimally protect the teeth, gums and jaw.  They flex, yet won’t tear.  They won’t limit speech or breathing.  More importantly, more since they fit perfectly they are more likely to be used regularly than an ill-fitting one.”

Ready-made mouthguards may be cheaper, but don’t fit as well thereby making it harder to speak or breathe.  Consequently, they are worn less.  Also, they also do not provide the same comfort and protection as a custom athletic mouthguard.

Check out more recommendations regarding  on what to do in case of dental injury.

Contact All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry and find out how we can incorporate your child’s team colors into his or her custom athletic mouthguard.

Save your smile with a mouthguard!

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

5 Things You Must Know About Dental Sealants

April 17th, 2017

1. What are they?

A dental sealant is a protective coating that is placed over the grooves of a tooth to prevent dental cavities.  Sealants help protect the chewing surface of teeth.  Sealants are generally placed on molars, but sometimes can be placed on hard to reach crevices on other teeth.

2. How are the done?

Once the tooth is cleaned and dried, the sealant material is placed onto the grooves of the tooth.  A curing light is then used to harden the liquid sealant into a hard, waterproof, cavity fighting shield.

3. Do I need to get my teeth numbed for sealants to be placed?

No. The process of placing a sealant is quick and painless.  No local anesthesia is needed.

4. How do I maintain them?

Brush and floss just like you would any other teeth. Also to prevent sealants from chipping avoid ice or hard candy.

5. How do I find out more about sealants?

Check out our website for more info about sealants.  Then, contact All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry and inquire about sealants for your child.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

The Perfect Road Map For Your Child’s Oral Health

August 8th, 2016

On July 3rd, 1806, two years into their journey to chart the uncharted west of America, pioneer explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark reached a challenge of epic proportion – the Rocky Mountains. What next, they wondered? Without a map, they were forced to do what explorers do – explore, and hope for the best. So, that got us thinking. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a handy map you could use to chart your own dental health? With that in mind, and in honor of our “Dog Days of Summer” explorers, we at All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry wanted to share with you a few mile markers you can use to stay on top of your child’s health today, next year, and for years to come!

6 to 24 months

When you’re a new parent, life is a whirlwind, and the dental care of your newborn may not be top of mind when you look in their mouths and see no teeth! Here are some things to keep in mind:

Schedule a visit: As soon as that first tooth comes in, you’ll want to contact us to schedule a visit and set up a periodic exam schedule. Also, be aware the ADA recommends fluoridated toothpaste now for all children under the age of three. Don’t wait!

Ask us about:

  • Home hygiene basics: Things like, tips and tricks on brushing and other care. There’s nothing better than having our hygienists give brushing tutorials – they’re experts!
  • Preventative dentistry: The possible need for fluoride supplements
  • Dietary strategies: Achieving a balanced diet early in life for good oral health later
  • Feeding practice awareness: Bottle, breastfeeding, and no-spill training cups
  • Infant feeding issues: tongue-tied, latch issues
  • Non-nutritive oral habits: Thumb sucking, pacifiers
  • Injury-proofing your home: Avoiding types of furniture that is more prone to causing dental injury

2 to 12 years old

Ah, the little ones are growing up. Teeth are coming in at all sorts of crazy angles, and you’re going crazy from the rise in obligations.

Here’s a quick list of what to consider during this time frame:

  • Preventative dentistry: Pit and fissure sealants can do wonders for keeping your child’s dental bills down, and their teeth in their head until they’re ready to fall out naturally. Ask us about them. They’re affordable AND useful. And, super-fast, you’ll be in and out in no time.
  • Orthodontic Consultation: Visiting an orthodontist for an early consultation is best done around your child’s seventh birthday. With today’s technology, early intervention can reduce the cost and duration of braces when your child gets older.

The Teen Years

The years “everything” happens! As children start to come into their own, new habits and desires begin to unfold as well. You’ll have to address every imaginable concern during these years, from piercings, to calls for whitening, braces, and the need to refer yourself away from your pediatric dentist and to a general dentist for continuing oral care.

So, speak with us about:

  • Cosmetic Dentistry: What solutions are advisable now, and what things should be avoided.
  • Teen social pressures: Smoking, alcohol, intraoral/perioral piercings and the like. Believe it or not, we can help a lot with this. Does your teen have a favorite All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry hygienist? We might be able to arrange for that person to help when your teen comes in so they can address these concerns with an intermediary they trust. Contact us here at All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry to see how we can help!
  • Orthodontics: Options for minimizing appearance and health problems later in life.
  • Home hygiene tips: Brushing, flossing, choosing the right mouthwash.
  • Craniofacial injury prevention: With your children’s possible participation in sports, you’ll want to get them a mouthguard. Hands down it’ll be one of your best investments in a healthy mouth. And we make great ones at All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry!
Staying on top of your child’s oral health isn’t as hard as you think, and if you keep this schedule handy, you’ll be ahead of most of your neighbor's kids when it comes to a healthy mouth and body. Come to think of it … why not share it with them as well?  They’ll thank you for the help.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

Saving Space for Permanent Teeth with a Space Maintainer

April 5th, 2016

If your little one's teeth have begun to fall out, and their permanent replacements appear to be lagging far behind, you may wish to consider a space maintainer to minimize future orthodontic work. Believe it or not, the absence of your child's teeth might seem cute now, but those tiny little gaps can cause deep gouges in your pocketbook as you watch them fill up with teeth that don't belong there. Space maintainers are simple to use, kids get along fine with them, and they have become the standard for protecting the cosmetic and functional aspects of your growing child's mouth.

Why Your Child Might Need a Space Maintainer

When a child's tooth is lost early due to trauma, tooth decay, or nature's insistence that it drop out before its permanent replacement is due, a space maintainer can be used to hold back the natural inclination of teeth to move forward. Without preventing this movement, teeth that should be in the rear of our mouths end up along the sides, and take up precious real estate destined for another tenant. The result is overcrowding, and in some cases impacted teeth. In the end, it's always easier to save the space now, then create it later.

How They Work

Space maintainers are very similar in purpose and design to an adult "bridge," but instead of placing artificial teeth over the gap, the space is kept open to accommodate its future resident.  At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we make most space maintainers out of metal, and custom-mold them to the shape of your child's mouth. In most cases, the maintainer is made up of a metal band attached to a rectangular-shaped wire that butts up against the tooth across the gap. This acts to temporarily preserve the space where the baby tooth once was, so its replacement can erupt without obstruction.

Does My Child Need One?

It's important to note that dental space maintainers are not required for all childhood tooth loss, and that we’re not going to suggest you create a decade worth of space maintainers as each tooth falls out of your child's mouth. Our bodies are quite effective at saving space for the loss of our front teeth as well as our incisors - it's the teeth along the sides of our mouths that tend to cause the majority of complications. Of course, each mouth is different, so be sure to discuss with us the best course of action for you and your child. If your child has recently lost a tooth, or several teeth, and it’ll be awhile before they’re scheduled to see  Dr. Allen Job, give us a call to see if you should come in a little earlier.  You can reach us by clicking  here.

Using a space maintainer is an affordable and effective way to ensure your child's teeth come in where they are supposed to, and when they're ready. It can have a positive effect on your wallet, reduce the amount of time your child needs to wear braces, and control the cosmetic appearance of your child's teeth and mouth.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

 

When do children usually lose their baby teeth?

March 30th, 2016

Many parents worry that their children’s teeth are not falling out on time. A lot of concerned parents want to know: When will my child lose his or her first baby tooth? At what age should the last tooth fall out? Is there a specific order in which the teeth are lost?

Dr. Allen Job and our team explain that a child's 20 baby teeth (primary teeth) typically come in by age three and begin to loosen and fall out on their own to make room for permanent teeth, which usually appear by the time your child is six. It is important to know that timing may vary, and girls typically lose their baby teeth earlier than boys. The last baby teeth will likely fall out by the time your child is 13.

So, which teeth do children lose first? Baby teeth tend to fall out in the order in which they came, which means the lower center incisors are usually the first to go when your child is between six and seven years old. The next teeth your child will lose are his or her top center pair, also called the upper central incisors.

It’s important to note that if a child loses a baby tooth early as a result of decay or an unforeseen accident, his or her permanent tooth may erupt early and potentially come in crooked due to limited space. If your child suffers an injury or has tooth decay, we encourage you to give us a call to set up an appointment with Dr. Allen Job.

While we know some children couldn’t be more excited to lose their baby teeth, we know others are anxious about this childhood milestone. When your child starts to lose teeth, our team at All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry encourages you to stress the importance of proper dental care on a daily basis.

Remember to:

  • Remind your child to brush his or her teeth at least twice a day. Supervise and offer assistance as needed.
  • Help your child floss his or her teeth at bedtime.
  • Limit eating and drinking between meals and at bedtime, especially sugary treats and drinks, such as candy and soda.
  • Schedule regular dental visits for your child every six months.
  • Ask about the use of fluoride treatments and dental sealants to help prevent tooth decay.

To learn more about baby teeth, or to schedule your child's next visit with Dr. Allen Job at our San Diego, CA office, please give us a call today!

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

How safe are dental X-rays?

March 23rd, 2016

Dr. Allen Job and our staff rely on digital X-rays to help us diagnose oral conditions and process images at incredibly high speeds. You can also view digital X-rays in real time while we examine your mouth with an intraoral camera and upload the images to a software program. A chairside computer monitor lets you see these images as we refine areas of concern to ensure an accurate diagnosis.

But are dental X-rays safe?

Yes! They emit 80 percent less radiation than exposure-type X-rays and provide detailed images to improve diagnosis and treatment. We can now detect dental problems in their earliest stages without subjecting you to unnecessary radiation. The amount of radiation released by digital X-rays is “negligible,” which means the amount is so small, that it can be safely disregarded.

Safe enough for children and pregnant women, digital X-rays detect microscopic pitting in tooth enamel and other abnormalities in the oral tissues that might have remained undetected with traditional X-rays. When Dr. Allen Job and our staff discover dental caries in their earliest stages, we can initiate treatment measures that will effectively prevent cavity development, tooth decay, and potential tooth loss.

Patient appointment lengths are shortened with digital X-rays as well, because images are immediately viewable and do not require the exposure time associated with old-style X-rays.

How Digital X-Rays Differ from Traditional X-Rays

Instead of using cardboard-contained film, we insert a small sensing device about the size of a pen in your mouth and engage the digital X-ray machine by manually manipulating control buttons. Within seconds, images appear on the monitor that can later be stored in your file or sent to another doctor for further examination.

The increased resolution afforded by digital X-rays means that patients are able to understand the seriousness of their dental issues better, and are more inclined to follow through with procedures recommended by Dr. Allen Job.

Safer, Better and Faster

For detection of cancerous tumors in their early states, digital X-ray technology offers vast improvements over film X-rays because of its cutting-edge image processing capability. Early detection of oral cancer and dental caries is the best way to prevent any type of oral health problem from exceeding the treatable stage.  Contact our office to setup your child's next dental visit.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

St. Patrick’s Day

March 16th, 2016

On March 17, everyone has a little Irish in them. St. Patrick’s Day is a joyous celebration of Irish heritage. The holiday originated as a commemoration of Saint Patrick, who brought Christianity to Ireland. The saint arrived in Ireland in 432 and earned the reputation of a champion of Irish Christianity. March 17th, the day of St. Patrick’s death, has been commemorated by the Irish for over 1,000 years. St. Patrick’s Day is still observed as a religious feast day by several Christian denominations, but it is better known in the public imagination as a rich celebration of Irish culture.

St. Patrick’s Day has been an official public holiday in Ireland since 1903. Each year, the Irish celebrate with a several-day festival that includes theater performances, music, fireworks, and festive parades. The celebration is also a public holiday in Northern Ireland, Montserrat, and Newfoundland and Labrador. In other parts of the world with heavy Irish populations, it is an unofficial celebration of Irish heritage. Parts of Great Britain, Canada, Argentina, South Korea, Switzerland, New Zealand, the United States, and Australia commemorate the holiday each year. Typical celebrations in these countries include drinking green beer, wearing green, eating traditional Irish foods, parades, and shamrock decorations.

Many people, Irish and non-Irish alike, take part in the “wearing of the green” on St. Patrick’s Day. In fact, the color originally associated with Saint Patrick was blue. His use of shamrocks to explain the Holy Trinity to the Irish made the green clover emblematic of the holiday, leading to the traditional green attire worn by thousands on St. Patrick’s Day. Other little-known facts about St. Patrick’s Day include the following:

  • Each year, the United States and Ireland face off in a rugby competition called the “St. Patrick’s Day Test.”
  • Montreal celebrates the holiday with an annual parade, which has been held each year since 1824. The Montreal city flag even features a shamrock in its corner, as a nod to its Irish heritage.
  • The Guinness World Records named St. Patrick’s Day the “Friendliest Day of the Year.”
  • Along with Valentine’s Day, St. Patrick’s Day is one of the most widely celebrated saint’s day in the world.

No matter your cultural heritage, St. Patrick’s Day is a great time to let loose and celebrate your inner Irish-ness! Don your greenest attire and exclaim “Erin go Bragh!” (Ireland forever!) to everyone you meet. From Dr. Allen Job - have a great St. Paddy’s day!

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

Baby Steps Series: Thumb Sucking, Pacifiers, and Your Baby’s Teeth

March 9th, 2016

Sucking is a common instinct for babies and the use of a pacifier or their thumb offers a sense of safety and security, as well a way to relax.

According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, the majority of children will stop using a pacifier and stop sucking their thumb on their own between the ages of two and four years of age. Prolonged thumb sucking or use of a pacifier can have dental consequences and needs be taken care of sooner, rather than later.

Many dentists favor pacifier use over thumb sucking because it makes it easier for parents to control and even limit the use of a pacifier. If thumb sucking lingers, the same strategies used to break the baby from using the pacifier can be used for thumb sucking.

Precautions

  • Try to find "orthodontically correct" pacifiers, as they may reduce the risk of dental problems.
  • Never dip a pacifier in sugar or honey to calm the baby.
  • Give your baby a bottle of water at bedtime, never juice.

Dental Complications

Long term pacifier use can lead to an assortment of dental complications including:

  • The bottom teeth leaning inward
  • The top teeth slanting outward
  • Misalignment of the baby’s jaw

The risk of any or all of these things happening is greatly increased if thumb sucking and pacifier use is sustained after the baby’s teeth start to come in.

Breaking the Thumb Sucking and Pacifier Habit

Most toddlers and children will stop sucking their thumb or using a pacifier between the ages of two and four on their own. However, if intervention is necessary here are a few tips to help your child break the habit:

  • Slowly decreasing the use of a pacifier can be effective for many children. This method does not work very well with thumb sucking.
  • Thumb sucking can be more difficult to break. Dr. Allen Job may recommend using an over the counter cream that you put on the child’s thumb; it doesn’t taste good and usually does the trick.
  • Rewards can also help with the process.
  • If these simple commonly used strategies do not work, there are oral devices that will prevent a child from sucking their thumb or a pacifier.

Talk to Dr. Allen Job and our team, as we have many tricks up our sleeves that will be effective in breaking your child’s thumb sucking or pacifier use.  Contact All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry today to schedule your child's dental visit.

*This blog is part of the Baby Steps Series. Look for future blogs in this series.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

Good Nutrition Leads to Healthy Mouths

March 8th, 2016

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we know the most common oral health diseases are tooth decay and periodontal disease (or gum disease), and both are among the easiest to prevent. One of the most common ways we recommend to boost your oral health is by improving your diet, because you (and your mouth) truly are what you eat. A healthy diet can lead to a healthy mouth and body, while an unhealthy diet can lead to the exact opposite.

The Role Nutrition Plays

While diet is not the only factor that leads to periodontal disease, studies suggest the disease may be more severe among patients whose diets lack essential nutrients. Poor diets will generally lead to a weaker immune system, leaving your body susceptible to all kinds of ailments, including periodontal disease.

A Well-Balanced Approach

There is no “magic” diet that we can recommend to improve your oral health, but the most important thing is to seek a well-balanced approach in your eating. While fad diets that emphasize one food group over another may help you lose weight in the short-term, they probably will not provide all the nutrients your body needs in the long run.

Meals should include a balance of lean meats or other healthy protein sources, colorful fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, and healthy fats. Foods containing substantial amounts of sugar and salt should be consumed in moderation.

Soda and Sugar: A Dangerous Duo

Millions of gallons of soda are consumed every day in America, but sipping a cold soft drink can be very harmful to your teeth. Many of these beverages wear down the enamel that protects the teeth, which weakens and even destroys them over time. The American Beverage Association estimates that soft drinks account for almost 30 percent of all drink consumption in the U.S., averaging an annual total of about 50 gallons per person (up from only 20 gallons in the 1970s). For healthy teeth and a healthy body overall, try to limit your soda intake.

Sugar is another ubiquitous treat in our daily lives. When we eat sugar, naturally occurring bacteria in our mouths convert it to acids that attack tooth enamel. Consuming too much sugar can swiftly lead to tooth decay, cavities, and gum diseases like gingivitis. Most people do not even realize how much sugar they consume each day. It’s important to limit your daily sugar intake by reading the labels of all the food you eat, and sticking with natural food sources that are low in sugar, especially ones that minimize added sugar, such as fruits and vegetables.

If you have questions about your diet and how it may be affecting your oral health, talk to Dr. Allen Job about it. See you soon! Contact us to schedule your child's next dental visit.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

Baby Steps Series: The Importance of Baby Teeth

March 8th, 2016

Dr. Allen Job and our team know it can be easy to underestimate the significance of baby teeth. At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we sometimes meet parents who assume that since their child's baby teeth, also known as primary teeth, eventually fall out and are replaced, they are less important. But did you know baby teeth serve purposes other than biting, chewing, and digesting food properly?

Baby teeth are essential not only for your child’s language development, but they also serve other important functions, like contributing to the normal development of your child’s jaw bones and facial muscles. Baby teeth also reserve space for your child’s future permanent teeth.

So, when do baby teeth fall out?

A baby tooth is intended to remain in your child’s mouth until the permanent tooth underneath it is ready to take its place. Sometimes, either due to a tooth being knocked out accidentally or being removed because of tooth decay, kids lose baby teeth before the permanent teeth are ready to erupt. If a tooth is lost, the teeth on either side of the open space may possibly push into the open space. The result? There may not be enough room for the permanent tooth when it is finally ready to erupt.

If you have any questions about your toddler’s teeth, or if your child is experiencing issues that concern you, please give us a call to set up an appointment at our convenient San Diego, CA office.

*This blog is part of the Baby Steps Series. Look for future blogs in this series.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

Tooth Eruption Timeline

February 17th, 2016

Parents, and even older children, can become concerned about tooth development. Wondering when teeth should erupt, and being concerned when the teeth do not appear on schedule, is common. First, you need to remember that each individual is different. Guidelines are just guidelines, but Dr. Allen Job and our team at All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry thought we would pass on this information to help you.

Primary teeth

Children normally have 20 primary or baby teeth. The first two to appear are usually the lower central incisors between six to ten months of age. These fall out between five and seven years of age.

  • Two upper central incisors – eight to 12 months
  • Two upper lateral incisors – nine to 13 months
  • Two upper cuspids or canines – 16 to 22 months
  • Two upper first molars – 13 to 19 months
  • Two upper second molars – 25 to 33 months
  • Two lower lateral incisors – ten to 16 months
  • Two lower cuspids or canines – 17 to 23 months
  • Two lower first molars – 14 to 18 months
  • Two lower second molars – 13 to 31 months

As you can see, all the primary teeth normally have erupted before three years of age, but the timeline can vary by four to six months. Except for the lower central incisors and second molars, upper teeth tend to appear before lower teeth.

Permanent or adult teeth

Adults normally have 32 permanent teeth. However, four of these are wisdom teeth or third molars, which are often removed.

  • Two upper central incisors – seven to eight years
  • Two upper lateral incisors – eight to nine years
  • Two upper cuspids or canines – 11 to 12 years
  • Two upper first premolars or bicuspids – ten to 11 years
  • Two upper second premolars or bicuspids – ten to 12 years
  • Two upper first molars – six to seven years
  • Two upper second molars – 12 to 13 years
  • Two upper third molars or wisdom teeth – 17 to 21 years
  • Two lower central incisors – six to seven years
  • Two lower lateral incisors – seven to eight years
  • Two lower cuspids or canines – nine to ten years
  • Two lower first premolars or bicuspids – ten to 12 years
  • Two lower second premolars or bicuspids – 11 to 12 years
  • Two lower first molars – six to seven years
  • Two lower second molars – 11 to 13 years
  • Two lower third molars or wisdom teeth – 17 to 21 years

Please discuss any of your dental concerns during your visit with Dr. Allen Job. If there is a problem with tooth development, the earlier we address it, the better the outcome. We specialize in pediatric dentistry and look forward to helping you and your child with all your dental needs. To learn more about tooth eruption, or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Allen Job, please give us a call at our convenient San Diego, CA office!

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

The Transformation of Valentine’s Day

February 10th, 2016

Did you know the actions leading to the beginnings of Valentine's Day were actually centered on the avoidance of war? A Catholic priest named Valentine defied the orders of the Emperor Claudius II and secretly married young men and their brides after the emperor had declared it illegal because only single, young men could be sent to war. Rather than lose potential soldiers to fight his war, Claudius attempted to hoard them by proclaiming marriage illegal.

Valentine continued to marry young couples anyway and, eventually, was put to death for it in 270 AD. Before his death, he sent a letter to a secret love and signed it “From your Valentine”. Nearly 1,800 years later, people are still signing letters and cards in this manner. This year, carry on the tradition started long ago, while adding your own twist. Here are a few suggestions.

Simple and Creative Valentine's Day Ideas

  • Memorialize it with a Photo. Couples often have photos taken around Christmas, but Valentine's Day photos allow you to capitalize on romance. Famous couple Julia Child and her husband, Paul, had their picture taken together every Valentine's Day and included their sense of humor with silly props.
  • Return to Your First Date Location. Even if your first date together was at a local hotdog stand, its sentimental value can make it a fun part of your Valentine's Day agenda. Be creative and make a treasure hunt with clues that lead your partner to the original date location, where you can express your love with flowers or a gift.
  • “From Your Valentine” Messages. Deliver your message in a creative way to make this Valentine's Day stand out from the others. Bake your partner's favorite treat and write a message on it with a tube of icing, or draw a note on the steamed up mirror so it shows up when your partner takes a shower.

Although Valentine's Day is a day to celebrate love, it doesn't have to be a special day only for couples. If you're single, use this special day to shower yourself with love, because you're worth it! After all, the priest Valentine believed so strongly in the sanctity of love that he was willing to risk his life for it. Whether you're in a relationship or single, young or old, romantic or not, Valentine's Day is for you. Happy Valentine’s Day from the pediatric dentist office of Dr. Allen Job.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

Oral Health Concerns for Teens

February 3rd, 2016

You have a lot more freedom as a teenager than you did as a young child. You also have a lot more responsibilities, and one of your jobs is to take care of your teeth. Develop and maintain good dental habits now so you can have great dental health for life!

Tooth Decay

As a teenager, you risk tooth decay, or dental cavities, if you are not careful. In fact, 59% of adolescents aged 12 to 19 have at least one cavity, according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. Dr. Allen Job and our staff recommend keeping your teeth strong and healthy by brushing at least twice a day and flossing every day.

If you suspect that you have tooth decay, do not be embarrassed. Instead, ask your parents to bring you to All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry to get it addressed. When you do not treat your dental cavities, they can turn into more serious problems. A severely damaged tooth may need to be treated with a root canal or even an extraction.

You can take easy steps to prevent tooth decay when you are at school or hanging out with your friends. Carry a bottle of water around with you so you can take a sip after you eat any kind of food. Choose water or milk instead of soda or sports drinks, and if you chew gum, select a sugar-free flavor.

Other Oral Health Concerns

You can probably think of many reasons why you should not smoke or use tobacco. Your oral health is another one. Tobacco gives you bad breath and stains your teeth yellow. It also increases your risk for gum disease and cancer of the mouth. Smoking even slows the speed of healing after you have dental procedures done.

Here are a few more tips that can keep your mouth attractive and healthy during your teen years.

  • Drink plenty of milk.
  • Limit candies and sugary snacks.
  • Wear a mouthguard if you play a contact sport.
  • Visit pediatric dentist twice a year.
  • Reduce infections and avoid piercing your tongue and lips.

You only get one set of permanent teeth in your life, so get in the habit of taking care of them now!

Contact us to schedule an appointment with Dr. Allen Job.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

Baby Steps Series: Oral Health Concerns for Infants

January 27th, 2016

Because babies’ teeth don’t appear until around six to eight months of age, it’s a natural misconception that they don’t need dental care. But the steps you take as the parent of an infant can help your baby maintain good oral health and develop healthy dental habits in the future.

It’s easy to take care of a baby’s teeth and gums, especially when oral hygiene for your infant becomes part of the normal daily routine. Learn more about how you can promote good dental health for your baby with these tips and considerations.

Taking Care of Baby’s Oral Hygiene

  • Dental Hygiene for Birth to Six Months. Cleaning your infant’s gums is as important as cleaning teeth will be later. Hold your baby in your arms, and with a clean, moistened washcloth wrapped around your index finger, gently massage his or her gums.
  • Dental Hygiene for Six to 12 Months. After teeth begin to appear, it’s time to switch to a soft, children’s toothbrush for teeth cleaning. New research has shown that fluoride toothpaste is safe and recommended for use once your baby’s first tooth arrives. Gently brush your baby’s teeth after each feeding, in the morning, and before bedtime, just as you did before teeth appeared.
  • Good Bedtime Habits. One of the most important things you can do to protect your infant from tooth decay is to avoid the habit of putting baby to bed with a bottle. Use other soothing bedtime activities, such as rocking and lullabies, to help your baby drift off to sleep.
  • A Note about Dental Decay. Many people are unaware that dental decay is transmissible. Avoid placing your baby’s bottle, sippy cup, or pacifier in your own mouth to test the temperature. Likewise, don’t share utensils with your baby.

Partner With Your Dentist

Your baby should receive his or her first dental health checkup by the age of six months. Even though your infant may not have teeth yet, Dr. Allen Job can assess the risk your baby might face for oral diseases that affect hard or soft tissues. Dr. Allen Job can also provide you with instructions for infant oral hygiene, and explain what steps to add as your baby grows and develops.

All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry is your partner for good oral health, and we’re here to make caring for your baby’s dental hygiene and health easier and more enjoyable for you. Contact our office for your child's next dental appointment. We are centrally located in San Diego, CA.

*This blog is part of the Baby Steps Series. Look for future blogs in this series.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

How can parents help prevent tooth decay?

January 20th, 2016

Children are born with a set of primary teeth – 20 to be exact – that help them learn to chew and speak, and develop enough space in the jaw for the permanent teeth that will appear several years later. Kids are especially susceptible to decay, which can cause pain and tooth loss – a problem that could interfere with oral development. As a parent, it is important that you take proactive steps to keep your child’s teeth as healthy as possible.

Bottles and “Sippie Cups”

One of the biggest culprits of childhood tooth decay is poor diet. This begins as early as a few months old, when children are often allowed to go to bed with bottles and “sippie cups” of milk or juice. The sugars in these beverages – even natural sugars – can steadily decay the teeth.

Dr. Allen Job and our staff suggest serving children milk and juice only at meal times, and limiting juice intake to just a few ounces per day. If your child becomes thirsty between meals or likes to go to bed with a bottle, serve water during these times.

Hygiene

As a parent, you can establish healthy dental habits long before your child’s first tooth erupts. Start by gently wiping your baby’s gums with a clean wash cloth during the first months of life. By age one, graduate to an appropriately sized toothbrush with fluoridated toothpaste, and brush at least twice a day.

Dental Visits

Dental visits should start young and continue on a regular basis throughout your child's life. Dr. Allen Job and our staff recommend parents bring their children to All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry for the first time no later than the child’s first birthday. Initial visits concentrate on parental education, while later visits may include thorough cleanings and fluoride treatments as your child grows.

For more information about keeping your child’s teeth cavity-free, contact our San Diego, CA office to schedule a dental consultation and checkup.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

When should my child start using toothpaste and how much should I use?

January 13th, 2016

As a parent, it is your job to instill good dental habits in your kids, and this starts even earlier than you might realize. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry responds to the “when to start” question with a succinct “The sooner the better!”

From the time your baby is born, you should make sure that your child’s gums are regularly cleaned using water and a toothbrush made for infants. Once the first tooth erupts, you should visit the pediatric dentist for the first time.

Once your child’s teeth start to appear, you can begin brushing two times per day, using fluoride toothpaste. Choose a toothbrush made specifically for your child’s age group, and one with has soft bristles.

Only a small smear of toothpaste is needed if your child is under two years old. Once the child celebrates his or her second birthday, you can use a pea-sized amount of fluoridated toothpaste. Continue this practice until your child is five.

Of course, it is important that you monitor your child’s tooth brushing closely to help educate about proper techniques. Some young children might try to eat or swallow toothpaste, and this needs to be strongly discouraged. Be sure to teach proper rinsing and spitting behavior to round out your child’s early childhood tooth-care regimen.

For young kids, tooth brushing can be made into a fun event, and you can find a multitude of special toothbrushes that appeal to kids. There are even uniquely flavored and colored toothpastes that might encourage your child to get into the brushing game!

Dr. Allen Job and our staff often recommend that if your child is a year old, but has yet to get the first tooth, you should bring your son or daughter to our San Diego, CA office for his or her initial dental care appointment.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

Baby Steps Series: When should I begin brushing my baby's teeth?

January 6th, 2016

One question our team at All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry hear all the time is, “When should I start brushing my baby’s teeth?”

You should begin regular cleanings even before your baby has teeth. After each breast feeding (or bottle-feeding) use a clean, damp washcloth to gently rub your baby’s gum tissue. You may wrap the material around one finger to make it easier to remove any food bits from your baby’s mouth.

When your baby’s first tooth comes in, switch to a baby toothbrush. Look for special baby toothbrushes in your drugstore; they have just a few bristles and are very soft. There are even brushes shaped like finger puppets that fit over the tip of your pointer finger! All you need at this point is water (no toothpaste yet).

After a few more teeth appear, you may start using toothpaste, but you only need a tiny bit, and make sure it doesn’t contain fluoride for the first two years. From the beginning, have your little one practice spitting the toothpaste out after brushing. That way, he or she will already have the good habit of spitting when you switch to fluoride toothpaste, which should never be swallowed.

If you have any questions about caring for your baby’s teeth, then schedule an appointment at our convenient San Diego, CA office. Please contact All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry.

*This blog is part of the Baby Steps Series. Look for future blogs in this series.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention.  He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

Welcome to Our Blog

March 3rd, 2014

Thank you for taking the time to visit our blog. Please check back often for weekly updates on fun and exciting events happening at our office, important and interesting information about the pediatric dental industry, and the latest news about our practice.

Feel free to leave a comment or question for our doctor and staff - we hope this will be a valuable resource for our patients, their families, and friends!