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COVID19 Response from All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry

May 8th, 2020

Dear Patient:

We hope this letter finds you and your family in good health. Our community has been through a lot over the last few months, and all of us are looking forward to resuming our normal habits and routines. While many things have changed, one thing has remained the same: our commitment to your safety.

Infection control has always been a top priority for our practice and you may have seen this during your visits to our office. Our infection control processes are made so that when you receive care, it’s both safe and comfortable. We want to tell you about the infection control procedures we follow in our practice to keep patients and staff safe.

Our office follows infection control recommendations made by the American Dental Association (ADA), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). We follow the activities of these agencies so that we are up-to-date on any new rulings or guidance that may be issued. We do this to make sure that our infection control procedures are current and adhere to each agencies’ recommendations.  Our employees will be following strict guidelines that include donning additional personal protective equipment (PPE), getting daily temperature readings, and being asked the screening questions each day.

We will be scheduling all appointments starting Monday May 18, 2020.  You may see some changes when it is time for your next appointment. We made these changes to help protect our patients and staff. For example:

  • We are limiting the number of people accompanying your child to one parent per child. If you have multiple children they are welcome to come with up to 2 parents. Please do not bring other family members or friends to the office at this time.
  • Our office will communicate with you beforehand to ask some screening questions. See the bottom of the page for the screening questions. If you or your child is experiencing any symptoms, please call our office to reschedule with at least a 24-hour notice. You’ll be asked those same questions again when you are in the office.
  • A temperature reading will be taking for every person entering the office.
  • We have hand sanitizer that we will ask you to use when you enter the office. You will also find some in the reception area and other places in the office for you to use as needed.
  • You may see that our waiting room will no longer offer magazines, children’s toys and so forth, since those items are difficult to clean and disinfect.
  • Appointments will be managed to allow for social distancing between patients. That might mean that you’re offered fewer options for scheduling your appointment.
  • We will do our best to allow greater time between patients to reduce waiting times for you, as well as to reduce the number of patients in the reception area at any one time.

We look forward to seeing you again and are happy to answer any questions you may have about the steps we take to keep you, and every patient, safe in our practice. To make an appointment, please call our office at 858-737-9000 or visit our website.

Thank you for being our patient. We value your trust and loyalty and look forward to welcoming back our patients, neighbors and friends.

Sincerely,

Dr. Allen Job & Team

 

Screening Questions for Parent/Guardian and Patient:

Have You (parent/guardian) or They (patient):

 

  1. Had a Fever, Cough, or Shortness of Breath in last 14-21 days?
  2. Had flu-like illness like gastrointestinal upset, headache, or fatigue?
  3. Had a recent loss of taste or smell?
  4. Been in contact with anyone who have tested positive for COVID19?
  5. Traveled to regions affected by COVID19 in the past 14 days?

 

Save your Heart by Brushing your Teeth

March 12th, 2020

According to a recent study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, toothbrushing multiple times a day can lower one's risk of heart disease.

Let's Dig Deeper

This study involved one hundred sixty thousand participants between the ages of 40-79 years, who were tracked over a ten year span.  These individuals had no history of atrial fibrillation or heart failure at the the beginning of the study.

The study results were independent of factors such as age, gender, socioeconomic status, exercise frequency, alcohol consumption, and other behaviors that could damage the heart.

At the ten year followup evaluation, they there 4,911 participants who had developed atrial fibrillation and 7,971 developed heart failure.

Back to Basics

Anatomy of the Heart:

The heart has 4 chambers.  The two upper chambers are called the atria.  The two lower chambers are called ventricles.  Oxygen-poor blood returns from the body and flows first into the right atrium then into the right ventricle.  From here the blood gets oxygen from lungs. Now oxygen rich blood flows into the left atrium and then into the left ventricle.  Now the blood is pumped out of the heart to the rest of the body. The atria and ventricles contract or "pump" blood in a coordinated way.  Click here to see an animation by the American Heart Association.

What is Atrial fibrillation?

According to the American Heart Association, atrial fibrillation is noted by a quivering heart beat or irregular heart beat.  This can lead to blood clots, stroke or heart failure.  Click here to see an animation of Atrial fibrillation.

What is Heart Failure?

According to the American Heart Association, heart failure occurs when the heart is not pumping as effectively as it could be.  The heart cannot keep up with its workload.  Therefore, the body is not getting enough oxygen that it needs. This condition is a chronic continuous degradation of heart muscle that leads to worsening performance of the heart without medical intervention.  Therefore, one common term that is associated with the ineffective heart, is congestive heart failure. Click here to seen an animation of heart failure.

Toothbrushing Benefits

According to this study, toothbrushing at least three times a day reduces one's risk of atrial fibrillation and heart failure. Researchers from this study believe that the mechanical action of the toothbrush against teeth help lower bacterial levels that are below the gum level before they enter the bloodstream.

Put this Concept into Practice

Brush your teeth after mealtimes.  Parents, do this for your own health and then model this habit to your children.  Children often will follow a parent's lead.  Children who are too young to brush their own teeth should be assisted by a parent or guardian. Often I hear from parents that say that their child doesn't like to have their teeth brushed or won't tolerate it.  When I ask the parent how often they brush their teeth, it is often less than two times a day.  Please note that you are the parent. It is your responsibility to take care of your child.  A child will protest all day long to avoid anything he or she doesn't like.  Toothbrushing is one battle that you have to win, parents.  For a toothbrushing refresher, head to our page on preventive care.

Toothbrushing is an effective way to not only help your teeth, but it can also reduce your risk for some heart diseases like atrial fibrillation and heart failure. Start today!

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. For more than a decade, served as assistant professor for the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at Loma Linda University School of Dentistry (LLUSD). He is currently an instructor at LLUSD.

 

 

 

 

 

Band Instruments and Your Teeth: Are They Related?

February 10th, 2020

Learning a musical instrument enhances cognition, trains focus, and helps channel adolescent energy. There’s also the added benefit of a built-in social network of kids working to bring alive once again the musical works of the masters.

Despite all that good stuff, though, some instruments might pose a hazard to the integrity of your child’s teeth, mouth, and jaw – and even their overall health. For most parents, this isn’t top of mind when considering or fostering the learning of a musical instrument.

Let’s take a look at what should be on your radar.

Bacteria

We’re all pretty good at annihilating the bacteria that crop up around our children at home, but how good are you at cleaning their spit-collecting musical machine?

Brass and wind instruments harbor a bounty of nasty molds, yeast and bacteria that can cause asthma and a host of other illnesses. Those yucky spit monsters can indeed make your child ill.

Be sure instruments are cleaned regularly, and cleaned well. Doing so can help your child stay healthy, while also ensuring the instrument will perform at its best.

Here’s a very comprehensive grouping of instructions to help you clean both wind and brass instruments. Print ‘em out and hang ‘em on the fridge!

Lip and Tooth Trauma

Playing a wind or brass instrument requires the player to forcefully hold their instrument against or within the lips to produce a sound. This pressure can present problems for delicate lip tissue and growing teeth.

Soft acrylic guards can be purchased to offset some of this pressure, and are commonly used for children wearing braces. Ask us for suggestions.

Additionally, children prone to  cold sores  can suffer more frequent outbreaks due to playing an instrument. You’ll see this cause and effect play out by noticing where your child tends to get sores.

Woodwind players tend to have outbreaks on the lower lip, and brass instrument players on the upper lip. Woodwind players also experience outbreaks at a rate  twice that of non-musicians.

Head and Neck Trauma

A stringed instrument might seem like the most benign choice when picking an instrument for your child. After all, there’s no contact with the lips or teeth, and there’s no bacteria to worry about.

That is until you realize the position one must get in to play these instruments.

Holding a violin or viola all day might not be the best thing in the world for one’s face, neck and chin. Good playing posture, and reduced playing time is the best preventative medicine if your kids play these two instruments.

It’s also worth noting that because of this awkward playing position, violas, and violins can contribute to, and even exacerbate, cross-bites and overbites.

Consult with your music teacher for the best advice specific to your child. Which brings us to …

Choosing the Right Instrument

Before your child even picks up an instrument, consult with a music teacher familiar with how a player relates to that instrument. A well-informed, passionate band director will know which instruments fit which children best based on their size and weight, teeth structure, finger and hand strength, etc.

Here is a wonderfully thorough starter on  choosing the right instrument for your child  to help get you started.

All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit. Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention. Check out our monthly blog posts! Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Get acquainted with us by watching our practice video and find out what we do.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy! Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online. Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send. On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time. For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. For more than a decade, served as assistant professor for the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at Loma Linda University School of Dentistry (LLUSD). He is currently an instructor at LLUSD.

How to Quickly Treat Cold Sores

January 15th, 2020

[caption id="attachment_992" align="alignleft" width="620"] How to Quickly Treat Cold Sores[/caption]

How To Quickly Treat Cold Sores

Got a Cold Sore? Here’s How to Treat It Quickly.

Ugh. A cold sore appears a couple days before a party where you’ll be photographed as much as the Royal Couple. That smile that we’ve been working on together just went from hero to zero, right?

Not necessarily. Finding which cold sore treatment works best for you can help speed along its healing. And that’s why we’re here.

Maybe It Isn’t a Cold Sore, Right?
Let’s clear the air about what a cold sore is and isn’t.

Cold sores are contagious blisters that usually appear on your lips or around your mouth. Caused by a virus, cold sores usually start with a tingling sensation, evolve into numerous tiny, painful blisters, and later crust over.

Canker sores, on the other hand, aren’t contagious, but they still sting. Unlike cold sores, they usually appear as white oval lesions inside your mouth, especially near or on your gums.

Remedies for Cold Sores

The key to treating a cold sore is acting fast. As soon as the first symptom appears, consider these steps to move the healing process along quickly:

• Apply Ice to the Cold Sore

At the first sign, grab an ice cube, wrap it in a paper towel, place it where you feel the cold sore coming on, and let it melt. Back-to-back applications can reduce the pain.

• Switch to a Cold-Sore-Fighting Diet

You can boost your immune system’s fight against this viral nuisance with the right foods. Fill your plate with cruciferous vegetables, like broccoli, kale, and cauliflower, and avoid foods with arginine, a cold-sore-triggering amino acid found in nuts, chocolate, and oats.

• Dial Down the Stress

One of the most common causes of cold sores is, surprise, surprise, stress. Minimizing stress these days can get so complicated that it causes more stress, right? But try giving yourself some time for the restorative, restful activities that drop your heart rate and raise your smile.

• Reach for Aloe Vera or Even an Over-The-Counter Cream

Both natural and medicinal creams have shown promise as cold sore remedies. Some studies suggest that aloe vera can help the fever blister heal, and over-the-counter creams, like docosanol, also tout their ability to knock the sore out of cold sores. Prefer the medicinal route? Check with your  pharmacist before using it.

• Use Sunscreen

If you are planning to go outdoors, use a lip balm that is SPF 30 or greater to over the affected lip areas.

• Relieve Pain with Acetaminophen or Ibuprofen

Some cold sores can get really painful. For those intense ones, acetaminophen or iburprofen may provide well-needed relief. Just be sure that your pharmacist recommends that type of over-the-counter medication.

• Laser Therapy

In a rush and don't have a week for the cold sore to heal?  Why not ask Dr. Job if laser treatment is a good option for you. Dr. Job utilizes laser therapy to jump start the healing process for cold sores.  The treatment is completed in a short appointment.

There you have it. You’re on the fast track to treating that cold sore quickly and living your best life at the party. Don’t forget to smile!

Note, cold sores left untreated may affect other parts of the body and create serious illness.

All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit. Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention. Check out our monthly blog posts! Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Get acquainted with us by watching our practice video and find out what we do.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy! Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online. Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send. On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time. For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. For more than a decade, served as assistant professor for the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at Loma Linda University School of Dentistry (LLUSD). He is currently an instructor at LLUSD.