flossing

If You're An Athlete You Should Do These 4 Things to Protect Your Teeth

December 3rd, 2019

[caption id="attachment_143" align="aligncenter" width="500"] If you're an athlete you should do these 4 things to protect your teeth[/caption]

 All Athletes Do This

Being an athlete, whether  playing in little league or a varsity sport, can be challenging.  Not only does this take additional dedication and time, but you also burn a lot of calories.  Athletes need additional nutrients to replenish those lost during times of activity.

So what do ALL athletes do?

Athletes get hungry and thirsty. They grab snacks that are easy to pack for the ball field.  These snacks are usually in the form of quick replenishers.  These included energy bars, gels, and sports drinks.  These forms of sugar contribute to high levels of tooth decay and acid erosion

Athletes also exhibit some form of mouth breathing during activity times.  Why do athletes mouth breathe?  Mouth breathing allows more oxygen into the lungs. This is a good thing, right?  No. This form of airway exchange dries the mouth out, leading to inflammation of gums.

The Study

According to recent study by the British Dental Journal, athletes have a high rate of oral disease. In this study researchers surveyed 352 Olympic and professional athletes across 11 sports.  They measured the athletes level of tooth decay, gum disease, and acid erosion.  In addition they asked the athletes what steps they took to keep their mouth, teeth, and gums healthy.

Here is what they found out:

Good News

  • 94% Athletes brushed their teeth twice daily, compared to 75% of the general population.
  • 44% Athletes flossed regularly, compared to 21% of the general population.
  • >50% Athletes have good oral health related habits: brushing twice daily, regular dental checkups, not smoking, and have a healthy diet.

Bad News

  • 50% Athletes had untreated decay.
  • >50% athletes had early signs of gum inflammation.
  • Almost 1 out of 3 athletes reported their oral health negatively impacted their training and performance.
  • Elevated risk of oral disease from dry mouth in "elite" athletes.

Four Recommendations for Your Teeth

Though the study did not make any recommendations.  I have chosen some easy guidelines for athletes to follow.

1. Develop good oral habits. This includes brushing at least twice a day and flossing at least once a day. I would recommend brushing keeping a travel toothbrush, toothpaste, and floss with your gear. Brush your teeth after your practice or competition. If you need a refresher, checkout our preventive care page.

2. Drink equal amounts of water as sport drinks. Drinking water will help wash away the residual sugars left on your teeth by sports drinks.

3. Eat healthier snacks.  Eat nuts such as almonds and walnuts.  Also eating cheese can be a good source of protein and calcium. Eating slices of apples provide a two fold benefit. First, apples can also give you the sugars and energy you need without the sugar spike.  Second, eating apples cleanse your teeth naturally. Find more information about nutrition on our nutrition and oral health page.

4. Regular dental checkups.  As athletes, keeping in optimal health is important so that you aren't distracted by any bodily ailments from keeping you in top performance. Visit your dentist at least twice a year.  Dental checkups will help detect and treat decay. Moreover, it will help detect early signs of gingivitis will help you stay optimally fit.  Also your dentist can discuss mouth protection devices such as mouth guards to help prevent accidental trauma while participating in sports activities.

All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit. Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention. For more information about digital x-rays check out our website section. Still want more information? Check out our monthly blog posts! Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Get acquainted with us by watching our practice video and find out what we do.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy! Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online. Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send. On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time. For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. For more than a decade, served as assistant professor for the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at Loma Linda University School of Dentistry (LLUSD).  He is currently an instructor at LLUSD.

5 Reasons Why Your Gums Might Be Bleeding

October 15th, 2019

[caption id="attachment_817" align="alignleft" width="640"]5 reasons why your gums might be bleeding 5 Reasons Why Your Gums Might Be Bleeding[/caption]

 

Seeing some red in the sink after brushing or flossing may raise an eyebrow or two. It may seem like your gums are bleeding for no reason. But before you venture down the rabbit hole of what-ifs, consider these common causes of gum bleeding.

Common Causes of Bleeding Gums

New Teeth Erupting

With children, as new teeth erupt, gums can become more sensitive.  This can lead to mild bleeding or spotting as those new teeth come in. One recommendation would be to use a damp washcloth to clean those gums during this eruption phase of your child's teething process.

Vigorous Toothbrushing

The extra oomph you’ve put into your brushing since your most recent visit may be the first place to look. Instead of brushing with the vigor you’d use while scrubbing a stack of plates after Thanksgiving, aim for gentle and patient: place the bristles along your gums at a 45-degree angle, and gently brush two to three teeth at a time.

Inadequate or Forceful Flossing

Changing your flossing routine can also cause your gums to bleed. If you’ve returned to regular flossing after a little hiatus or if you’re flossing more forcefully than usual, bleeding is common. Remember to floss daily and with ease.

Medication

Some over-the-counter medications, including aspirin, as well as prescription drugs, like blood thinners, may lead to gum bleeding. Be sure to let us know which medications you’re taking, and keep us in the loop if you and your healthcare provider change your medications. Herbal medications and supplements may also lead to gum bleeding, so check with your physician before taking these supplements for yourself or giving them to your child.

Vitamin Deficiency

A deficiency in vitamins is a common factor in gum bleeding. Vitamin A helps form your teeth and protects your mouth’s membranes; Foods that boost Vitamin A include: green leafy vegetables like spinach, kale, and collard greens.  Orange colored fruits and vegetables are a good source of vitamin A such as oranges, apricots, cantaloupes, pumpkins, and carrots.

Vitamin C helps maintain the health of your teeth and gums.  A rich source of Vitamin C include citrus fruits, potatoes (yes, potatoes), and green leafy vegetables.

Vitamin K ensures your blood clots. Foods rich in vitamin K include green leafy vegetables, parsley, brocoli, and brussel sprouts.

If you’ve upped your hygiene game but still spot blood after brushing, try adding more vitamin-rich foods to your diet.

Gingivitis and Periodontitis

Gum bleeding, as well as swelling and tenderness, is a common symptom of gingivitis and periodontitis. Often due to poor oral hygiene, both gingivitis and the more-serious periodontitis do require treatment.

When It’s Time for a Visit

If you make changes to your oral health routine but the bleeding doesn’t improve within 10 days, it’s best to come in for a visit.

All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit. Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention. For more information about digital x-rays check out our website section. Still want more information? Check out our monthly blog posts! Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Get acquainted with us by watching our practice video and find out what we do.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy! Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online. Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send. On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time. For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. For more than a decade, served as assistant professor for the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at Loma Linda University School of Dentistry (LLUSD).  He is currently an instructor at LLUSD.

Flossing Review

September 12th, 2019

[caption id="attachment_761" align="alignleft" width="600"]flossing review Flossing Tips[/caption]

 

 

 

 

Flossing 101

Of all the things you can do to maintain a healthy mouth, flossing has got to be the least expensive! But many patients don’t take the time to floss. And if you do, you might not be doing it correctly!

Welcome to Flossing 101…

Why should you floss?

Your toothbrush isn’t enough to brush away the plaque that can build up between teeth and at the gumline. A complete dental routine includes both brushing and flossing.

How often should you floss?

Once a day is ideal. Believe it or not, flossing more often (or with more rigor) can damage your gums. The only exception to once-a-day flossing is if you need to remove pieces of stringy or sticky foods that get stuck after eating. Don’t leave those in there too long.

Should you floss before or after brushing?

Either one is fine! We recommend flossing first, so that all the food debris that is found between your teeth can be pushed away from those tight spaces. While the floss helps to remove most of this material, some of if will adhere to your teeth.  Now, brushing your teeth will help to remove that material off.

How should you floss?

Pull out about 12 inches of floss (any brand is fine).

Wind the floss tightly around your index or middle fingers on both hands so that the floss between your hands is taut.

Slide the floss between each set of teeth that touch, as well as where your last molar meets your gums.

Slide the floss up and down the teeth, following the natural curve of each tooth in a “C” shape.

Imagine the floss giving each tooth a little hug! Floss between teeth and where your teeth meet your gums.

Use a new clean section of floss for each set of teeth.

Click here, for more information on flossing from the American Dental Association.  Also, checkout our webpage for our infographic on flossing techniques.

Can’t floss?

If your child is too young to floss or if you feel you are unable to do for your child, then try using a floss pick instead.  Remember, instilling the habit of flossing daily for your child will help him or her have a skill that will last them a lifetime.

All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit. Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention. For more information about digital x-rays check out our website section. Still want more information? Check out our monthly blog posts! Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Get acquainted with us by watching our practice video and find out what we do.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy! Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online. Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send. On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time. For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. For more than a decade, served as assistant professor for the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at Loma Linda University School of Dentistry (LLUSD).  He is currently an instructor at LLUSD.

Breaking Bad: Dental Habits To Break as a Child

May 2nd, 2019

[caption id="attachment_703" align="alignleft" width="640"]Bad Dental Habits To Break Bad Dental Habits To Break[/caption]

 

Nobody’s perfect. We all pick up bad habits along the way. Even our oral health isn’t immune. Try as you may, odds are you're child may have picked up a habit or two in the name of convenience.

That’s totally okay! We get it. And that’s why we’re here: to ensure your child's oral health is in fantastic shape.

Here are a few less-than-stellar dental habits that we often see, with some tips on how to break them.

Thumbsucking

If your child is putting his or her thumb or any finger in his or her mouth  this can led to several problems.  First, there in increased bacterial transfer from the fingers to the oral cavity, which can lead to illness.  Second, thumbsucking may shift your child's teeth and also reshape the palate.  This can lead to misalignment of teeth and even airway issues.

Need more advice? Check out our page for more info about thumbsucking.

Inconsistent Dental Checkups

If your child hasn't seen  the dentist every six months, or if it’s been a while since we’ve seen your smile, schedule an appointment today!

You can call us at 858-737-9000 or go through our scheduling portal to make an appointment. Staying on top of your child's health today can save yourself a lot of time and money down the road.

Not Flossing

Again, you probably figured this would be on here. And you know what, it’s for good reason. Flossing helps prevent decay and gum recession. It’s extremely important!  This maybe even more important than brushing.

So how can you help your child remember to floss more? Put a post-it note on your child's mirror as a reminder. Invest in a flossing stick — some people find it much easier than the traditional method.  Make it stick: Floss at the same time each day to build up a routine.

You can also start small, setting a goal of once per week. After that settles in you may find yourself craving a good floss after brushing.  This will help your child gain the skill as it becomes part of his or her nighttime routine.  Parents, check out our flossing techniques if you need a refresher.

Brushing Too Vigorously

One of the top causes of worn enamel is brushing too hard. If your child complains that his or her arm is sore after brushing, pull back on the reins. Along with the enamel, over time this friction will also wear away your child's gum tissue.

Remember to keep the toothbrush at a 45-degree angle toward the base of the gums, and move the brush in a gentle, circular motion.

Not Brushing Long Enough

If your child is taking less than 2 minutes to brush his or her teeth then he or she is not getting their teeth brushes adequately.  Sometimes it may see like a race to see who finishes brushing the fastest.  One way to help them brush for the full 2 minutes is to use a timer. You can use an old fashion sand timer or put a 2 minute alarm on a stop watch or smartphone.  You can even search for 2 minute songs on Youtube for them to listen while brushing.

Using an Old Toothbrush

When was the last time you changed your child's toothbrush? It’s not something you often think of, right? The problem with using an old toothbrush its frayed bristles can end up damaging your child's teeth rather than cleaning them properly.

You should change your child's toothbrush every three to four months. A good mnemonic device is to change your toothbrush on the first day of every new season. That way you’ll never have an old brush!

Letting the Water Run

This one is self-explanatory, and it’s an easy fix. After you wet your tooth brush turn off the tap. That initial wetting is all the water you’ll need. Turning off the water is good for your bill and great for the planet.

All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit. Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention. For more information about improving your child's oral health check out our preventive dentistry page. Still want more information? Check out our monthly blog posts! Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Get acquainted with us by watching our practice video and find out what we do.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy! Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online. Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send. On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time. For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. For more than a decade, served as assistant professor for the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at Loma Linda University School of Dentistry (LLUSD).  He is currently an instructor at LLUSD.

Should I Brush Before I Floss?

April 2nd, 2019

[caption id="attachment_699" align="alignleft" width="604"]should I brush before I floss Should I Brush Before I Floss?[/caption]

The age-old question – should you floss before you brush or after? If you asked any one of our team members, you just might get a different answer on this one!

Before you report them for not knowing their stuff, each response can be right! As long as you’re doing a thorough job, we don’t care when you floss!

The Case for Flossing Before Brushing

Theoretically, flossing first dislodges the gunk between your teeth, letting the fluoride in your toothpaste reach those crevices better.

Also, behavioral scientists say since most people don’t like to floss, it’s better to get the least-pleasant half of your dental routine out of the way first – you’ll be less likely to skip it. Once you have a minty, fresh mouth from brushing, you might be less inclined to feel the need to floss
afterward.

The Case for Flossing After Brushing

Some say flossing last is better because it clears your mouth from extra food and debris that could otherwise be carried by the floss into the very spaces you’re trying to clean out.

Plus, it might be more pleasant to put those flossing hands into a clean mouth versus an unbrushed one.

Bottom Line

Floss when it works for you. But make it a habit! Choose the same time every day, floss once a day, and floss thoroughly.

And don’t forget to use the right flossing method: for each new set of teeth, use a new section of floss, and hug each side of the tooth by dragging the floss upward in the shape of a “C.”

Want us to show you how? Just ask!

All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit. Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention. For more information about improving your child's oral health check out our preventive dentistry page. Still want more information? Check out our monthly blog posts! Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Get acquainted with us by watching our practice video and find out what we do.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy! Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online. Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send. On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time. For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.

 

Should I Brush Before Flossing?

November 7th, 2018

[caption id="attachment_664" align="alignleft" width="600"]Should I Brush Before I Floss Should I Brush Before I Floss?[/caption]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is an age-old question. Should you floss before you brush or after? If you asked any one of our team members, you just might get a different answer on this one!

Before you report them for not knowing their stuff, each response can be right! As long as you’re doing a thorough job when you floss! Let me explain.

The Case for Flossing Before Brushing

Theoretically, flossing first dislodges the gunk between your teeth, letting the fluoride in your toothpaste reach those crevices better.

Also, behavioral scientists say since most people don’t like to floss, it’s better to get the least-pleasant half of your dental routine out of the way first – you’ll be less likely to skip it.

Once you have a minty, fresh mouth from brushing, you might be less inclined to feel the need to floss afterward.

The Case for Flossing After Brushing

Some say flossing last is better because it clears your mouth from extra food and debris that could otherwise be carried by the floss into the very spaces you’re trying to clean out.

Plus, it might be more pleasant to put those flossing hands into a clean mouth versus an unbrushed one.

Bottom Line

Floss when it works for you. But make it a habit! Choose the same time every day, floss once a day, and floss thoroughly.

And don’t forget to use the right flossing method: for each new set of teeth, use a new section of floss, and hug each side of the tooth by dragging the floss upward in the shape of a “C.”  Need a refresher? Check out our flossing illustration to help you keep those pearly white teeth clean.

Want us to show you how? Just ask!

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry also has a handy infographic to maintaining healthy teeth for your children.

Last Note

Just remember, if you want your children to have healthy oral habits, such as flossing, you will have to start doing it yourself. Daily.  Research has shown that children mirror their parents.  Why not get them to start a habit that will be beneficial and one that they can use to save their teeth for the rest of their life!

All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry

At All Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, we incorporate proven techniques to share with you and your child at each dental checkup visit. Dr. Allen Job and his team are committed to providing the latest in oral health care prevention. For more information about brushing and flossing check out our preventive care page. Still want more information? Check out our blog posts on prevention! Our practice is centrally located in San Diego, CA.

Get acquainted with us by watching our practice video and find out what we do.

Scheduling an appointment for your child is easy! Start here to schedule an appointment. All of our forms are online. Fill them out securely from your smartphone or tablet and hit send. On appointment day, your child will be seen at their scheduled time. For example, if you have a 9:00 AM appointment, your child will be seen at 9:00 AM.

Dr. Allen Job, DDS, MS, MPH, MS is a board certified pediatric dentist who practices in San Diego, California, where he specializes in prevention. He is also an assistant professor at Loma Linda University Department of Pediatric Dentistry.